Dear Future Me,

Dear Future Me,

I think it’s crazy that in two and a half weeks we will be gathered around tables with our loved ones eating  Thanksgiving dinner.

These last few weeks, I’ve spent a lot of time reflecting on the past year, making sure that I’ve processed my most influential moments, so that I can approach 2020 with fresh eyes and an open heart.

I’ve been thinking about…

What went right?

What went wrong?

How do I need course-correct?

What do I really want of life? How do my values line up with that?

If you are also having these types of conversations with yourself about loving yourself more, pursuing your purpose and living authentically, I have something to propose.

I propose that we write our future selves a letter!

A letter that will serve as an introspective, non-formal way to goal-set and capture our current consciousness and thoughts in words.

What do you think? Do you have time? Are you in?

I hope so!

If so, you can use these guidelines that I found and combined with my own thoughts for your use:

1. Select a date to open your letter: 1 year? 5 years? 6 months?

2. Explain how you feel now. What are you currently dealing with? What are your fears and motivations?

3.  Split the letter into categories or roles: Personal (Physical, Mental, Emotional, Spiritual, Financial), Career, Motherhood, Marriage, etc.

4. Have questions for your future self. What are you grappling with now? What are you curious to ask your future self?

5. Goals and aspirations for the next five years (or the number of years that you are waiting) — Decree and declare what you want. What do you hope to achieve? Where are you going?

6. List the things you should stop doing, start doing and continue doing.

You can use FutureMe.org, a service that helps you send your message to your desired email address at any point in the future. Personally, I recommend writing your letter on your computer and saving it or printing and storing it, somewhere safe.

Just to get you started, I’d like to share my draft letter. I’ve borrowed some good one-liners in my research and retracted a few personal things.

Feel free to take what you need and leave what you don’t.

See below.

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